Posted in facts

Hands-on with Armikrog’s incredible claymation world

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Examined on paper, I can easily understand how point-and-click adventure game Armikrog accrued nearly a million dollars during its 2013 crowdfunding campaign: claymation visuals that defy expectation, an offbeat world full of talking dogs and fuzzy monsters, classic puzzle-solving that harkens back to adventure gaming’s golden age.

And then there’s Armikrog’s pedigree. Indie developer Pencil Test Studios’ core creative team consists of the same people who created Earthworm Jim and The Neverhood, the influential cult classic that pioneered Armikrog’s visual style and whose hero bares an uncanny resemblance to this new game’s protagonist, Tommynaut. That team in turn recruited some top voice talent—including Jon Heder (Napoleon Dynamite), Rob Paulsen (Pinky and the Brain), and Michael J. Nelson (Mystery Science Theater 3000)—to bring its quirky world to life.

According the the Magic Eight Ball of Expectation, all signs point to the game being excellent. After playing Armikrog on the E3 2015 showfloor last week, however, some concerns about the puzzle design brought me back down to earth. But let’s start with the good: The opening cinematic is short and sweet, elegantly framing Tommynaut and his bizarre canine companion Beak Beak as explorers who’ve crash landed on a hostile world. In fleeing from a silly-looking monster, they dive through a portal and a door slams shut behind them, leaving them no choice but to move forward through a series of rooms.

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It’s a fairly basic setup, sure, but at least it avoids tedious exposition. Plus, it fast tracks players to the game’s true star: controlling characters in Armikrog’s world of clay. Screenshots alone may have already sold you on the aesthetic, but seeing it in action confounds all expectations. The animations are just so incredibly smooth and seamless, I could hardly believe the world I was seeing was actually reacting to my inputs. I know this isn’t the first game to utilize stop motion claymation, but I can’t remember anything else that looked quite this good doing it.

Appropriately, the world itself somehow feels like a natural extension of the art style, embracing all the weird and wonderful quirks of the medium. Tommynaut, for example, stores items by simply shoving them into his squishy clay stomach, and one of the later rooms I encountered during my demo seemed to melt into shape as I entered it. From the character design to the (somewhat limited) dialogue, everything about Armikrog effuses this very particular offbeat quality.

Unique as the world may be, however, the gameplay still fell flat—at least in the limited portion I was able to play. I experienced several moments that made me think, “Am I an idiot or was this actually not super well designed?” Maybe I am an idiot, but either way, that thought’s not a great sign. To give you an idea of what I mean: When I walked up to the Armikrog kiosk, the Indiecade rep manning the station was trying desperately to exit a tile puzzle that provided no instructions and that couldn’t be abandoned once players clicked into it. She eventually had to quit out of the game entirely.

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Once I started a fresh game, the first puzzle consisted of picking up a lever, attaching it to a door, walking through an empty room, pushing a block back the way I came, and finally retrieving the original lever by sending Beak Beak through a hole in the wall. The only challenge came from the fact that I didn’t immediately notice the slot by the second door where I was meant to place the lever, which was more frustrating than challenging. It’s probably safe to assume Armikrog’s puzzles grow more sophisticated as the game progresses, but I didn’t get to see evidence of that in the demo.

Admittedly, the E3 showfloor is far from an ideal setting for first impressions, and the team at Pencil Test Studios still has a few months left to polish (good thing, considering the opening cutscene still consists largely of black and white placeholder sketches). We’ll see the complete picture when Armikrog is out on August 18.

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Posted in facts

Batman Pc Game ;reviews by tech2enjoy

“A clean shot to the head,” drones the villain known as Arkham Knight. “That’s all it will take.” At every opportunity, the Knight speaks of the horrific deeds he might perform, doing his best to drive fear into Batman’s heart throughout the open-world adventure game that features his name. Scarecrow similarly trades on Batman’s doubts, attempting to convince the troubled hero of his own impotence at every turn. “All eyes, all hopes upon a man who fails his friends,” calls out Scarecrow through Gotham’s public networks, reminding Bruce Wayne that he, too, bears responsibility for the losses his loved ones endure.

Batman is a troubled hero, and past Arkham games haven’t shied away from exploring his dark side. Arkham Knight is no exception: the caped crusader growls his way through one confrontation after another in which he must question his role in Gotham’s current crisis. We’ve seen these themes before, many times over, and Batman: Arkham Knight’s villains repeat them ad nauseum, as if you weren’t already choking on heavy-handed metaphors at every turn. It’s fortunate, then, that Arkham Knight, for all its ham-fisted storytelling and frequent returns to well-trod ground, features the qualities developer Rocksteady has infused its previous games with: superb production values, hard-hitting combat, and a wonderful sense of freedom as you soar above the skies of Gotham.

Hey, it’s the Batmobile! Over and over!

Scarecrow, Arkham Knight, and the legacy of the now-dead Joker loom large over this freedom. There is another, more surprising obstacle which you must overcome if you wish to retain your ownership of Gotham’s skies, however: the Batmobile. For the first time in this series, you can leap into the iconic vehicle and zoom down the streets, drifting around tight turns and pursuing key vehicles as they speed away. The driving itself is slick and satisfying, as long as you can overlook Rocksteady’s tendency to wrest away camera control to show you some dramatic sight or another. Yet there’s no beating the incredible rush of using your line launcher to fling yourself through the sky–and it’s worth mentioning that taking to the air is usually faster than settling behind the wheel. As a result, Arkham Knight is constantly trying to justify the Batmobile’s presence, forcing it upon you at nearly every opportunity.

Particularly in the latter third of the story, you’re frequently forced to take part in vehicular battles against remotely manned drones. When you first engage in this kind of combat, which turns the Batmobile into an agile tank, it’s a delight. You strafe from side to side, sliding the vehicle into safe areas between the visible lines that indicate the path of incoming enemy rockets. All the while, you fire your cannons at the drones and use small fire to eliminate missiles fired upon you; the dark sky lights up during these battles, giving vehicular combat an initial spark, and making you the director of a spectacularly violent fireworks display.

Gameplay utilizes Batman’s excellent detective skills. His orphan skills go underutilized, however.

But in spite of the upgrades the Batmobile earns over time–EMP blasts, the ability to hack enemy drones, and so forth–the Batmobile battles never become more interesting, just more monotonous, as they seem to go on forever. The story’s final hours succumb to a series of same-ish battles that play out more or less like the last, lending an air of tedium to what should be the game’s most poignant surprises. The Batmobile is also the centerpiece of a number of mediocre boss encounters, all manner of puzzles, boring cat-and-mouse games with superpowered tanks, and even some of the Riddler’s many optional challenges scattered across the city. Don’t be surprised should you end up muttering to yourself, “Too. Much. Batmobile.”

Arkham Knight is at its best when you are given the freedom of movement you both need and deserve. What a treat it is to look down upon this beautiful and derelict city as you glide through the thick, black air. Gotham has been deserted by most citizenry due to Scarecrow’s most recent threat to release a hallucinogenic toxin into the streets, making the clouded heavens and the stoic statues all the more imposing. The bat-symbol cuts an impressive silhouette in the sky, drawing you towards your next mission objective–and the objective itself may be a structure like the grandiose Panessa Movie Studios, where climbing ivy and guardian statues warn you of potential danger.

Arkham Knight is constantly trying to justify the Batmobile’s presence, forcing it upon you at nearly every opportunity.

Batman is beautifully animated and an absolute joy to control. To soar towards Man-Bat and tackle the shrieking beast in one of the game’s many side missions, and to zip to higher vantage points only to descend onto a rioter and deliver a hard kick, are the moments that represent Arkham Knight at its very best. Every mechanical edge is oiled to maximum slickness: Batman glides through Gotham with the confidence of an experienced predator, and exhibits the exact right amount of stickiness as he approaches surfaces. There is an astounding amount of flavor voiceover; Batman comments on the task at hand should you try to leave the area you are confined to, enemies remark on the number of fallen comrades they have counted during stealth encounters, and the annoyingly chatty thugs swarming the streets have more speaking lines than any number of film scripts. Few games are this rich in audiovisual details.

Don’t forget: Batman isn’t killing anyone in his rampage against Gotham’s enemies, though he delights just enough in breaking bones that it’s hard not to nod your head along to the Arkham Knight’s insistence that Batman is just as responsible for Gotham’s dereliction as anyone else. The storytelling gymnastics the game performs to remind you that Bruce Wayne is not a murderer are ridiculous. The Batmobile is using nonlethal rounds, you are told, and when you run over criminals, a little zap lets you know that you’re not squishing them under your tires, just giving them an electrical jolt as you pass. I could dismiss this mounting nonsense easily as forgivable video game logic if the narrative didn’t devote so much time explaining (and re-explaining, and re-re-explaining) that Batman lives by a non-killing code. Rocksteady tries to have it both ways, representing this code as an emotional conflict that figures heavily into the story, then letting you plow through crowds of bad guys without consequence. Even in the oft-illogical world of video games, the dissonance is striking.

 

Then again, this is a story about a billionaire in a bat suit, so perhaps there is only so much plausibility to be expected. It might be hard to believe Batman isn’t sending men to the morgue during Arkham Knight’s melee battles, but the series’ rhythmic hand-to-hand combat continues to set the bar high. Batman is a frightening, almost otherworldly creature as he tumbles and slides from one target to another, and his fists exhibit the raw power of any hammer or club. Stealth combat sequences, which offer astounding flexibility in how you approach enemies, are as good as ever. Slinking through vents, taking down a goon, and zipping away is as rewarding as it is to sabotage your armed foes with your disruptor rifle, causing their weapons to malfunction and leaving their owners open to attack. Smart level design and a large array of gadgets–a remote electrical charge, a machine that emulates villains’ voices, a hacking device, and so forth–keep each predator room as interesting as the last.

Batman’s many talents give rise to a terrific amount of variety. He is a scientist and a detective in addition to being Gotham’s scowling savior; he has a computer that knows the answers to every imaginable question (except the ones that drive the plot, of course); and he possesses the memory of an elephant rather than a bat–a nice skill to have when solving the murder mystery that serves as one of the game’s better side plots. Arkham Knight finds great ways of incorporating these talents into gameplay. For instance, you re-create a kidnapping by activating the returning bat-vision mode and scouring the street for clues. The crime’s events are then depicted on screen, allowing you to forward and reverse through them at will in your search for answers.

Poison Ivy is dressed for success, and like almost every one of Arkham Knight’s female characters, is in need of rescue.

Puzzles like this are clever, and the related tasks, such as scanning a corpse’s tissue to find anomalies, make you feel like an active participant in a real forensic analysis. The game constantly digresses, asking you to team up with comrades like Nightwing and Robin to deliver cooperative beatdowns, and to perform all number of secondary missions, which incorporate villains like Penguin, Two-Face, and Firefly. Some set pieces, such as one in which you defuse a set of bombs as a villain stands on a rotating platform, are particularly noteworthy for smart use of camera angles, and for the way the gameplay assists in characterization, teaching you about the miscreants at hand not just through dialogue and plotting, but through the way you interact with them.

Arkham Knight is loaded with villains, actually, including the one that gives the game its name: Arkham Knight himself. His identity is meant to be the game’s greatest mystery, but conspicuous foreshadowing, and a reliance on age-old storytelling cliches, make every reveal as surprising as the time The Mighty Ducks won that big hockey game. There are some tense story beats and moving events, but your two primary goals–to stop Scarecrow’s evil toxin plot, and to confront and unmask the Arkham Knight–are too predictable to be compelling.

Pow! Crunch! Whiff! Harumph!

What Batman: Arkham Knight does well, however, it does really well. Gotham is a dazzling playground where neon lights pierce through the rain and mist; all it takes is a single glimpse to tell you that this is a city in need. Moreover, many individual elements are so carefully constructed, and presented with such flair, that appreciation is the only reasonable reaction. Yet most of these elements–excellent acting, wonderful animations, moody soundtrack–are ones that Batman: Arkham City also excelled in, making Arkham Knight’s missteps all the more noticeable. Rather than escape the pull of the games that spawned it, The Bat’s newest adventure refines the fundamentals; it is a safe but satisfying return to the world’s most tormented megalopolis.

Posted in facts

88 before you throw away a post it

100 Life Hacks That Make Life Easier
LIFESTYLE BY mrpsyclone only on tech2enjoy.wordpress.com

[part-1]

Want to learn some quick and easy life hacks that are easy to do, low cost and saves you time? You’re in luck. We have collected 100 of these practical life hacks into this one big list that is easy to digest because they’re all images! By tweaking little things, it can make your life much easier. Enjoy!

83 tie a small piece of bright colored fabric

83 tie a small piece of bright colored fabric

84 write random letter

84 write random letter

85 use a rubberband

85 use a rubberband

86 dorm smell bad

86 dorm smell bad

87 lean your phone on your sunglassess

87 lean your phone on your sunglassess

89 how to waterproof your shoes

89 how to waterproof your shoes

90 take a picture of the name card

90 take a picture of the name card

91 iron inside out

91 iron inside out

92 old newspaper

92 old newspaper

93 tumble try shoes

93 tumble try shoes

keep a card like this

keep a card like this

94 soap bar

94 soap bar

95 make a hole

95 make a hole

96 drop the battery

96 drop the battery

97 use a coozie

97 use a coozie

98 when taking a picture

98 when taking a picture

use a clean dust pan

use a clean dust pan

try a pants hanger

use your cellphone light

use a spring from an old pen

try a pants hanger

quick and easy iphone speaker

user binder clips

use your cellphone light

now you see only pic that tell about hack4life

  • use a spring from an old pen

quick and easy iphone speaker

user binder clips

wrap a wet paper towel around your beverage

put pancake mix in a ketchup bottle

clean out an old lotion bottle for your beach

use a muffin tin to serve condiments at a bbq

doritos are great for kindling

use nail polish to identify different keys

use a hanging shoe rack to store cleaning supplies

freeze grapes to chill white wine without

use paper clips to organize your cables

almost finished your jar of nutella

sick of having a box full of tangled

unroll the rim to increase the capacity

cut open toilet paper rolls and use as a cuff

remove the stem from strawberries

turn an old bottle into a simple little cord holder

for iced coffee and iced cappuccino, use frozen coffee cubes

tired of snoozing past your alarm

place a rubber band around an open paint can to wipe your brush on

use bread clips to save flip-flops

take pictures of friends holding items

how i always know which headphone is the left one

put a stocking over the end of a vacuum